Total Productive Maintenance (TPM)

Total productive maintenance (TPM) is a maintenance approach that involves the participation of all employees in the maintenance process. This includes not only maintenance personnel, but also operators, supervisors, and managers. TPM focuses on maximizing the overall effectiveness of equipment and processes, and involves activities such as regular inspections and cleaning, as well as improvements to equipment design and operations. TPM is a holistic approach that aims to optimize the performance of equipment and processes, and can help prevent equipment failure and improve overall productivity.

Total productive maintenance (TPM) is a methodology that is used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of manufacturing and production processes. TPM is based on the idea that all employees, from operators to managers, should be involved in the maintenance and improvement of equipment and processes.

Japanese Institute of Plant Maintenance (JIPM):
Japanese Institute of Plant Maintenance (JIPM) is a non-profit organization based in Japan that promotes the concept of total productive maintenance (TPM) and provides education, training, and certification in TPM principles and practices. The JIPM also conducts research and development activities related to TPM, and provides support and resources for organizations implementing TPM programs. The JIPM was established in 1989 and has become a leading authority on TPM in Japan and around the world.

Eight Pillars of TPM
TPM is built on eight pillars, that provide a framework for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of manufacturing and production processes, by involving all employees in maintenance and improvement activities.  Eight pillars of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) are :

  1. Focused Improvement (Kobetsu Kaizen): This pillar involves identifying and addressing the root causes of inefficiencies and defects in production processes.
  2. Autonomous Maintenance: This pillar involves empowering operators and other employees to perform basic maintenance tasks, such as cleaning and inspecting equipment, without the need for specialized technicians.
  3. Planned Maintenance: This pillar involves scheduling and planning maintenance activities in advance, to ensure that equipment is available and ready for production when needed.
  4. Quality Maintenance: This pillar involves ensuring that maintenance activities are performed to high standards, to prevent defects and improve the quality of products.
  5. Early Equipment Management: This pillar involves identifying and addressing potential equipment failures and problems before they occur, to prevent disruptions to production.
  6. Safety, Health, and Environment: This pillar involves ensuring that TPM activities are performed safely, and that they do not have negative impacts on the health and wellbeing of employees or the environment.
  7. Education and Training: This pillar involves providing employees with the knowledge and skills that they need to perform their jobs effectively and contribute to improvement efforts.
  8. Office TPM: This pillar involves applying TPM principles and practices to administrative and support functions, such as finance, HR, and IT.

TPM – 5s
5S is a Japanese methodology that involves sorting, straightening, shining, standardizing, and sustaining equipment and processes in order to improve their efficiency and effectiveness.

5s in TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) stands for the 5S principles- Siri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu and Shitsuke.  5S can help improve the overall performance and reliability of equipment and processes by providing a systematic and organized approach to maintenance.

5s is an important component of TPM and can help drive continuous improvement and optimization of equipment and processes.5S methodology provides a structured approach for organizing and improving the efficiency and effectiveness of workplaces, by focusing on the principles of sorting, setting up, cleaning, standardizing, and sustaining improvements.

Seiri
This principle involves sorting and organizing the workplace, to ensure that only the tools and materials that are needed for current activities are present, and that everything is in its proper place.

Seiton
This principle involves setting up the workplace in an efficient and effective way, to minimize the time and effort required to perform tasks.

Seiso
This principle involves cleaning and maintaining the workplace, to ensure that it is safe and conducive to work.

Seiketsu
This principle involves standardizing the organization and cleanliness of the workplace, to ensure that all employees follow the same procedures and practices.

Shitsuke
This principle involves sustaining the improvements that have been made, through regular review and evaluation, and by continuing to train and educate employees on the 5S principles and practices.

Kobetsu Kaizen / Focussed Improvement:
Kobetsu Kaizen is a Japanese term that refers to improvement activities focused on specific areas or processes. It is a type of continuous improvement that focuses on making small, incremental changes to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of specific processes or activities. Unlike broader, company-wide improvement initiatives, Kobetsu Kaizen focuses on specific areas or processes and involves the participation of individuals or teams who are directly involved in those areas or processes. This approach can help identify and address specific challenges and opportunities, and can help drive continuous improvement at the local level.

JishuHozen / Autonoums Maintenance:
Jishuhozen is a Japanese term that refers to the maintenance of equipment by the operators who use it. This involves providing operators with the knowledge and tools to perform basic maintenance tasks, such as cleaning, lubrication, and minor repairs. Jishuhozen is a key component of total productive maintenance (TPM) and can help improve equipment performance and reliability by involving operators in the maintenance process. It can also help reduce the workload of maintenance personnel and improve overall productivity.

Planned Maintenance:
Planned maintenance in TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) is the application of planned maintenance principles and practices to equipment and processes. This can include activities such as regular inspections, cleaning, lubrication, and minor repairs, as well as more extensive tasks such as component replacements and upgrades. Planned maintenance in TPM is typically performed on a regular basis, such as daily, weekly, monthly, or annually, and is designed to prevent equipment failure and prolong the life of the asset. It is an important part of a comprehensive maintenance plan and can help ensure that equipment is operating efficiently and effectively. Planned maintenance in TPM involves the participation of all employees, including operators, supervisors, and managers, in the maintenance process.

Quality Maintenance:
Quality maintenance, the fourth pillar of TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) is a focus area on ensuring that equipment and processes are operating at the highest possible quality levels. This involves activities such as regular inspections, cleaning, and repairs, as well as improvements to equipment design and operations. It also involves involving all employees, including operators, supervisors, and managers, in the maintenance process. Quality maintenance in TPM can help prevent equipment failure and improve the overall performance and reliability of equipment and processes. It is an important component of TPM and can help drive continuous improvement and optimization of equipment and processes.

Early Equipment Maintenance:
Early Equipment Maintenance, is a type of maintenance that focuses on identifying and addressing potential issues before they become major problems. This can include activities such as regular inspections, testing, and monitoring of equipment to identify potential issues. Early equipment maintenance can help prevent equipment failure and prolong the life of the asset. It is typically performed using technologies such as vibration analysis, infrared thermography, and oil analysis, which can help identify potential issues before they occur. Early equipment maintenance is an important part of a comprehensive maintenance plan and can help improve equipment performance and reliability.

Safety, Health and Environment: 
The SHE (Safety, Health, and Environment) pillar in TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) is a focus on ensuring that equipment and processes are safe, healthy, and environmentally friendly. This involves activities such as regular safety inspections, hazard identification and risk assessment, and the implementation of safety measures and procedures. The SHE pillar in TPM also involves engaging all employees, including operators, supervisors, and managers, in the safety process. This can help prevent accidents, injuries, and environmental harm, and can improve the overall safety and health of equipment and processes. The SHE pillar is an important component of TPM and can help drive continuous improvement and optimization of equipment and processes.

Education and Training:
The education and training pillar in TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) is a focus on providing employees with the knowledge and skills to effectively maintain equipment and processes. This involves activities such as training programs, workshops, and seminars that provide employees with the knowledge and skills to perform preventive maintenance tasks, identify potential issues, and participate in improvement activities. The education and training pillar in TPM also involves involving all employees, including operators, supervisors, and managers, in the training process. This can help improve the overall performance and reliability of equipment and processes, and can drive continuous improvement and optimization. The education and training pillar is an important component of TPM and can help ensure that employees have the skills and knowledge to effectively maintain equipment and processes.

Office TPM:
Office TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) is the application of TPM principles and practices to office equipment and processes. This can include activities such as regular inspections and cleaning of office equipment, as well as improvements to office processes and procedures. Office TPM involves the participation of all employees, including office workers, managers, and support staff, in the maintenance process. It is a holistic approach that aims to optimize the performance and reliability of office equipment and processes, and can help prevent equipment failure and improve overall productivity. Office TPM is an important part of a comprehensive maintenance plan and can help drive continuous improvement and optimization in the office environment.

Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE):
OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) is a metric that measures the efficiency and effectiveness of equipment and processes. It is calculated by multiplying three factors: rate of availability, rate of performance, and rate of quality. Availability refers to the percentage of time that equipment is available for production, performance refers to the speed at which equipment operates, and quality refers to the percentage of good product produced. OEE is typically expressed as a percentage, with a higher percentage indicating more efficient and effective equipment and processes. OEE is a valuable tool for identifying and addressing potential issues and opportunities, and can help drive continuous improvement and optimization of equipment and processes.

Rate of Availability:
Rate of availability is a measure of the availability of production equipment for use. The rate of availability is calculated by dividing the total amount of time that the equipment is available for use by the total amount of time over which the availability is being measured. A high rate of availability in OEE calculation indicates that the equipment is reliable and can be relied upon to support the production process.

Rate of Performance:
Rate of performance is a measure of the speed at which production equipment can complete a given task or set of tasks. The rate of performance is often expressed in terms of the number of tasks completed per unit of time, such as tasks per second or transactions per minute. A high rate of performance in OEE calculation indicates that the equipment is operating efficiently and effectively.

Rate of Quality:
Rate of quality is a measure of the percentage of products or parts produced by the equipment that meet specified quality standards.  The rate of quality is calculated by dividing the number of products or parts that meet the specified quality standards by the total number of products or parts produced. A high rate of quality in OEE calculation indicates that the equipment is producing high-quality products or parts.

Poka-yoke
Poka-yoke, also known as mistake proofing or error proofing, is a quality control technique that is used to prevent errors and defects in manufacturing and other processes. The goal of poka-yoke is to design processes and systems in such a way that errors and defects are automatically detected and corrected, or prevented from occurring in the first place.

Poka-yoke systems can be implemented in a variety of ways, depending on the specific requirements of the process and the type of errors that are being targeted.

Maintenance Performance Sheet (MP Sheet)
A maintenance performance sheet is a tool that is used to track and evaluate the performance of a maintenance organization. The maintenance performance sheet typically includes a set of metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs) that are used to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization’s maintenance activities.The specific metrics and KPIs that are included on a maintenance performance sheet may vary depending on the organization and its specific requirements.   Some common metrics tracked in MP sheet include maintenance metrics related to per unit of production, per unit of time, per unit of equipment and per unit of labour.

Maintenance Performance sheet provides a way to track and evaluate the performance of a maintenance organization, by providing a set of metrics and KPIs that can be used to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of the organization’s maintenance activities.